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RED-EYED TREEFROGAgalychnis callidryasKaren  Warkentin, Boston Univ./ STRI

Eggs may not seem to do anything except sit  around waiting to hatch, but the embryos inside them can do lots of  behaving. That’s what undergraduate researcher Jessica Rogge of Boston  University found after observing the directed movements of red-eyed  treefrog embryos through the walls of their translucent, jelly-covered  eggs. Rogge and Boston University associate professor Karen Warkentin  found that even early on, the larval treefrogs wriggle around within  their cramped quarters to find the “sweet spot” near the surface that is  richest in oxygen.
When Rogge gently repositioned the embryos with a  probe, turning the small bodies away from their oxygen banquet, the  embryos quickly flipped themselves back into their favorite pose with  gills fanned wide. Even the youngest embryos—without blood, gills, or  muscles—would slowly cruise back into place.
Instead of depositing eggs in water, as most female frogs do, the red-eyed treefrog, an arboreal hylid native to Neotropical rainforests in Central America, lays  her eggs on the underside of a leaf overhanging water. Tadpoles can  hatch and drop into the water below just four days after the eggs are  laid. But time is on their side—the longer they wait before hatching,  the better equipped they will be to escape hungry mouths waiting in the  water below.
Fact Source: http://accessscience.com/IOW/iow.aspx?iowID=40
Other photos you may like:
Newly hatched Indian Ornamental Tree Spiders
White Spotted Bamboo Shark Embryos
Arowana with babies living in its mouth

RED-EYED TREEFROG
Agalychnis callidryas
Karen Warkentin, Boston Univ./ STRI

Eggs may not seem to do anything except sit around waiting to hatch, but the embryos inside them can do lots of behaving. That’s what undergraduate researcher Jessica Rogge of Boston University found after observing the directed movements of red-eyed treefrog embryos through the walls of their translucent, jelly-covered eggs. Rogge and Boston University associate professor Karen Warkentin found that even early on, the larval treefrogs wriggle around within their cramped quarters to find the “sweet spot” near the surface that is richest in oxygen.

When Rogge gently repositioned the embryos with a probe, turning the small bodies away from their oxygen banquet, the embryos quickly flipped themselves back into their favorite pose with gills fanned wide. Even the youngest embryos—without blood, gills, or muscles—would slowly cruise back into place.

Instead of depositing eggs in water, as most female frogs do, the red-eyed treefrog, an arboreal hylid native to Neotropical rainforests in Central America, lays her eggs on the underside of a leaf overhanging water. Tadpoles can hatch and drop into the water below just four days after the eggs are laid. But time is on their side—the longer they wait before hatching, the better equipped they will be to escape hungry mouths waiting in the water below.

Fact Source: http://accessscience.com/IOW/iow.aspx?iowID=40

Other photos you may like:

Newly hatched Indian Ornamental Tree Spiders

White Spotted Bamboo Shark Embryos

Arowana with babies living in its mouth

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