animals, animals, animals

Paying homage to the wonderful, unusual and diverse world of animals. I make no claim to content ownership. Sources are credited (with links) whenever possible — on both unique posts & re-blogs. Any post will be removed upon request (please provide URL link to the post/page). Enjoy! Email: animalworldtumblrblog@gmail.com Twitter: @animalworldtoo


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JAPANESE GIANT HORNET (Vespa mandarinia japonica) Photographer uncredited
Sometimes nature works in mysterious ways; and why local species are often better suited to fight native enemies. The story of the Japanese Giant Hornet and two species of honey bees…
In Japan, beekeepers often prefer European honey bees because they are more productive than the endemic Japanese honey bees. However, these hornets will often prey on the bees.
Once a Japanese giant hornet has located a hive of European honey  bees it leaves pheromone markers around it which  attract nest mates. A single hornet  can kill forty European honey bees in a minute and a group of 30 hornets  can finish off an entire hive containing 30,000 bees in about three hours. The hornets not only kill the bees, but also dismember  them. They return to their nest  with the bee thoraxes which they feed to their own larvae. The hornets also  gorge themselves on the bees’ honey.
The native Japanese honey bee, has a defense against  attacks of this manner. When a hornet approaches the hive. the bee workers emerge in an angry  cloud-formation with some 500 individuals. They form a tight ball  around the hornet and their vibrating wings increases the temperature  forming a convection oven. Because bees can survive  higher temperatures than the hornet, the latter dies.
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These hornets are large, but not particularly aggressive with humans, however being stung is extremely painful and requires hospital treatment. On average 40 people die every year of anaphylactic shock after having been stung.
Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_giant_hornet
Other photos you may enjoy:
Vespid - Paper Wasps
Social Wasps
Ruby-tailed Wasp

JAPANESE GIANT HORNET (Vespa mandarinia japonica) Photographer uncredited

Sometimes nature works in mysterious ways; and why local species are often better suited to fight native enemies. The story of the Japanese Giant Hornet and two species of honey bees…

In Japan, beekeepers often prefer European honey bees because they are more productive than the endemic Japanese honey bees. However, these hornets will often prey on the bees.

Once a Japanese giant hornet has located a hive of European honey bees it leaves pheromone markers around it which attract nest mates. A single hornet can kill forty European honey bees in a minute and a group of 30 hornets can finish off an entire hive containing 30,000 bees in about three hours. The hornets not only kill the bees, but also dismember them. They return to their nest with the bee thoraxes which they feed to their own larvae. The hornets also gorge themselves on the bees’ honey.

The native Japanese honey bee, has a defense against attacks of this manner. When a hornet approaches the hive. the bee workers emerge in an angry cloud-formation with some 500 individuals. They form a tight ball around the hornet and their vibrating wings increases the temperature forming a convection oven. Because bees can survive higher temperatures than the hornet, the latter dies.

—-

These hornets are large, but not particularly aggressive with humans, however being stung is extremely painful and requires hospital treatment. On average 40 people die every year of anaphylactic shock after having been stung.

Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_giant_hornet

Other photos you may enjoy:

Vespid - Paper Wasps

Social Wasps

Ruby-tailed Wasp

Notes

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    A research presentation on this amazing creature, during college.
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