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Paying homage to the wonderful, unusual and diverse world of animals. I make no claim to content ownership. Sources are credited (with links) whenever possible — on both unique posts & re-blogs. Any post will be removed upon request (please provide URL link to the post/page). Enjoy! Email: animalworldtumblrblog@gmail.com Twitter: @animalworldtoo


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CYCLOCOSMIA or TRAP DOOR SPIDER (Cyclocosmia truncata)
Cyclocosmia or “trapdoor spider” is a genus of spiders in the Ctenizidae family.
The abdomen of spiders in this genus is abruptly truncated and ends  in a hardened disc which is strengthened by a system of ribs and  grooves. 
The pattern of the end looks like a pre-Columbian design.*
They use this blunt end as a cork to stopper the entrance of their deep  vertical burrows when threatened, a phenomenon called phragmosis.
Strong spines are located around the edge of the disc. The four spinnerets are found just anterior to it, with the posterior, retractable spinnerets particularly large. C. ricketti females are 28 mm long, with a disc diameter of 16 mm. Only the bottom portion of the burrow is silk lined.
The individual species are separated from each other by the pattern  of the abdominal disc, the number of hairs on its seam, and the shape of  the spermathecae.
Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyclocosmia
Other images you might enjoy:
Beautiful Jumping Spider
Stalk-eyed Fly
Ball-Bearing Leafhopper
*patter below is on the plug end of the spider’s abdomen

CYCLOCOSMIA or TRAP DOOR SPIDER (Cyclocosmia truncata)

  • Cyclocosmia or “trapdoor spider” is a genus of spiders in the Ctenizidae family.
  • The abdomen of spiders in this genus is abruptly truncated and ends in a hardened disc which is strengthened by a system of ribs and grooves. 
  • The pattern of the end looks like a pre-Columbian design.*
  • They use this blunt end as a cork to stopper the entrance of their deep vertical burrows when threatened, a phenomenon called phragmosis.
  • Strong spines are located around the edge of the disc. The four spinnerets are found just anterior to it, with the posterior, retractable spinnerets particularly large. C. ricketti females are 28 mm long, with a disc diameter of 16 mm. Only the bottom portion of the burrow is silk lined.
  • The individual species are separated from each other by the pattern of the abdominal disc, the number of hairs on its seam, and the shape of the spermathecae.

Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyclocosmia

Other images you might enjoy:

Beautiful Jumping Spider

Stalk-eyed Fly

Ball-Bearing Leafhopper

*patter below is on the plug end of the spider’s abdomen

Notes

  1. pongwira reblogged this from animalworld
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  5. nuclearharvest reblogged this from animalworld and added:
    :o
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  7. birdjabber reblogged this from animalworld and added:
    I think these guys win...prize for coolest butt ever.
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