animals, animals, animals

Paying homage to the wonderful, unusual and diverse world of animals. I make no claim to content ownership. Sources are credited (with links) whenever possible — on both unique posts & re-blogs. Any post will be removed upon request (please provide URL link to the post/page). Enjoy! Email: animalworldtumblrblog@gmail.com Twitter: @animalworldtoo


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Reblogged from zolanimals
KOMODO DRAGON (Varanus komodoensis) ©FWNP.com
A member of the monitor lizard family, the Komodo Dragon is the largest living species of lizard, growing to a maximum of length 3 metres (9.8 ft) in rare cases and weighing up to around 70 kilograms (150 lb). 
Their unusual size has been attributed to island gigantism, since there are no other carnivorous animals to fill the niche on the islands where they live. However, recent research suggests that the large size of komodo dragons may be better understood as representative of a relict population of very large varanid lizards that once lived across Indonesia and Australia, most of which died out after the Pleistocene.
Here’s a paragraph for the books:
Copious amounts of red saliva that the Komodo dragons produce help to  lubricate their food, but swallowing is still a long process  (15–20 minutes to swallow a goat). A Komodo dragon may attempt to speed  up the process by ramming the carcass against a tree to force it down  its throat, sometimes ramming so forcefully that the tree is knocked  down. [Fortunately their metabolism is so slow they need only eat 12 times a year]
Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Komodo_dragon
Other photos you may enjoy:
Komodo dragons can reproduce through self-fertilization - this is an amazing piece
The world’s biggest Skink
Snoozing Iguana
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rhamphotheca:

zolanimals: Komodo Dragon (Varanus komodoensis)

KOMODO DRAGON (Varanus komodoensis) ©FWNP.com

A member of the monitor lizard family, the Komodo Dragon is the largest living species of lizard, growing to a maximum of length 3 metres (9.8 ft) in rare cases and weighing up to around 70 kilograms (150 lb). 

Their unusual size has been attributed to island gigantism, since there are no other carnivorous animals to fill the niche on the islands where they live. However, recent research suggests that the large size of komodo dragons may be better understood as representative of a relict population of very large varanid lizards that once lived across Indonesia and Australia, most of which died out after the Pleistocene.

Here’s a paragraph for the books:

Copious amounts of red saliva that the Komodo dragons produce help to lubricate their food, but swallowing is still a long process (15–20 minutes to swallow a goat). A Komodo dragon may attempt to speed up the process by ramming the carcass against a tree to force it down its throat, sometimes ramming so forcefully that the tree is knocked down. [Fortunately their metabolism is so slow they need only eat 12 times a year]

Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Komodo_dragon

Other photos you may enjoy:

Komodo dragons can reproduce through self-fertilization - this is an amazing piece

The world’s biggest Skink

Snoozing Iguana

—-

rhamphotheca:

zolanimals: Komodo Dragon (Varanus komodoensis)

Reblogged from rhamphotheca
LION’S MANE NUDIBRANCH (Melibe leonina) by Autopsea (via: JUNK Tumblog)
The “hooded nudibranch” or the “lion’s mane nudibranch”, is a species of predatory sea slug, with a large “hooded mouth” that it extends out and down like a net to catch its prey. When the ventral surface of the hood contacts a small animal, the hood  rapidly closes and the fringing tentacles overlap, holding in the prey  then forcing the whole animal into the mouth.
Prey include amphipods, copepods, mysids, other small crustaceans, small mollusks, small jellyfish and ctenophores, larvae of other invertebrates and in some cases small fish.
This nudibranch is up to 102 mm/4” long, 25 mm/1” wide, and 51 mm/2” across the expanded oral hood.
This species occurs on the west coast of North America, from Alaska to Baja California and is found on eel grass and other seaweeds near low tide and below, and in kelp forest in deeper water.

The body of this nudibranch is translucent. It is usually colorless  to pale yellow or green, with opaque brown hepatic diverticula. It has a  large expandable oral hood, fringed with sensory tentacles, which it opens and throws forward in order to catch food. A single pair of rhinophores (horns) on the hood are rounded and earlike. 4-6 pairs of flat paddle shaped cerata run along its dorsum in two rows.
Melibe leonina exudes a sweet fruity aroma when it is removed from the water, or when numerous individuals are kept together in captivity.
Fact Source:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melibe_leonina
Other photos you may enjoy:
Blue-tipped Nudibranch
Physonect siphonophore
Sea Slug
—-
rhamphotheca:

Melibe leonina by Autopsea (via: JUNK Tumblog)

LION’S MANE NUDIBRANCH (Melibe leonina) by Autopsea (via: JUNK Tumblog)

The “hooded nudibranch” or the “lion’s mane nudibranch”, is a species of predatory sea slug, with a large “hooded mouth” that it extends out and down like a net to catch its prey. When the ventral surface of the hood contacts a small animal, the hood rapidly closes and the fringing tentacles overlap, holding in the prey then forcing the whole animal into the mouth.

Prey include amphipods, copepods, mysids, other small crustaceans, small mollusks, small jellyfish and ctenophores, larvae of other invertebrates and in some cases small fish.

This nudibranch is up to 102 mm/4” long, 25 mm/1” wide, and 51 mm/2” across the expanded oral hood.

This species occurs on the west coast of North America, from Alaska to Baja California and is found on eel grass and other seaweeds near low tide and below, and in kelp forest in deeper water.

The body of this nudibranch is translucent. It is usually colorless to pale yellow or green, with opaque brown hepatic diverticula. It has a large expandable oral hood, fringed with sensory tentacles, which it opens and throws forward in order to catch food. A single pair of rhinophores (horns) on the hood are rounded and earlike. 4-6 pairs of flat paddle shaped cerata run along its dorsum in two rows.

Melibe leonina exudes a sweet fruity aroma when it is removed from the water, or when numerous individuals are kept together in captivity.

Fact Source:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melibe_leonina

Other photos you may enjoy:

Blue-tipped Nudibranch

Physonect siphonophore

Sea Slug

—-

rhamphotheca:

Melibe leonina by Autopsea (via: JUNK Tumblog)

EDWARD’S CRESTED GUINEAFOWL (Guttera pucherani edouardi) ©Jeff Whitlock
Love the James Brown (circa 1950s) hairdo
The Crested Guineafowl is found in open forest, woodland and forest-savanna mosaics in sub-Saharan Africa. It has a total length of approximately 50 cm (20 in) and the plumage  is overall blackish with dense white spots. It has a distinctive black  crest on the top of its head, the form of which varies from small curly  feathers to down depending upon subspecies, and which easily separates it from nearly all other species of guineafowl.
The species is monogamous with probable strong and long-lasting pair bonds. Courtship feeding is  common, the author having seen a captive male run 5-10 metres to the hen  to present some particular morsel. The nest is a well-hidden scrape in  long grass or under a bush; eggs vary from nearly white to buff and a  clutch is usually around 4 or 5.
Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crested_Guineafowl
Other photos you may enjoy:
East African Crested Guineafowl
Vulterine Guineafowl
Not at all related but equally odd-looking Baby Booby

EDWARD’S CRESTED GUINEAFOWL (Guttera pucherani edouardi) ©Jeff Whitlock

Love the James Brown (circa 1950s) hairdo

The Crested Guineafowl is found in open forest, woodland and forest-savanna mosaics in sub-Saharan Africa. It has a total length of approximately 50 cm (20 in) and the plumage is overall blackish with dense white spots. It has a distinctive black crest on the top of its head, the form of which varies from small curly feathers to down depending upon subspecies, and which easily separates it from nearly all other species of guineafowl.

The species is monogamous with probable strong and long-lasting pair bonds. Courtship feeding is common, the author having seen a captive male run 5-10 metres to the hen to present some particular morsel. The nest is a well-hidden scrape in long grass or under a bush; eggs vary from nearly white to buff and a clutch is usually around 4 or 5.

Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crested_Guineafowl

Other photos you may enjoy:

East African Crested Guineafowl

Vulterine Guineafowl

Not at all related but equally odd-looking Baby Booby

PHYSONECT SIPHONOPHORE (Marrus orthocanna) - ©Kevin Raskoff / NOAA
Like a multi-stage rocket, this bizarre microscopic creature, Marrus orthocanna is made up of multiple repeated units, including tentacles and multiple  stomachs. Never heard of a physonect siphonophore? That’s what this is.  It’s something like a jellyfish, and is more closely related to the  Portugese man o’war. One interesting thing about it: Like ants, a colony  made up of many individuals has attributes resembling a single  organism.
Other photos you may enjoy:
Swimba Worm
Water Bear
Peacock MiteSource: http://www.thedailygreen.com/environmental-news/latest/strange-sea-animals-2#ixzz1KaC49UJF

PHYSONECT SIPHONOPHORE (Marrus orthocanna) - ©Kevin Raskoff / NOAA

Like a multi-stage rocket, this bizarre microscopic creature, Marrus orthocanna is made up of multiple repeated units, including tentacles and multiple stomachs. Never heard of a physonect siphonophore? That’s what this is. It’s something like a jellyfish, and is more closely related to the Portugese man o’war. One interesting thing about it: Like ants, a colony made up of many individuals has attributes resembling a single organism.

Other photos you may enjoy:

Swimba Worm

Water Bear

Peacock Mite

Source: http://www.thedailygreen.com/environmental-news/latest/strange-sea-animals-2#ixzz1KaC49UJF

AFRICAN CRESTED PORCUPINE (Hystrix cristata) ©David Lansing
David Writes in his blog:We were just bumbling along through the African bush in the darkness, going  very slow both because it was difficult to see more than ten feet down  the road…and because we  weren’t at all sure where we were going. So we were all doing that thing  you do at night when you’re a little bit lost on an unfamiliar  road—leaning forwards and staring very intensely at the darkness  directly in front of you. Suddenly there were several large black lumps  moving across the road ten or twenty feet in front of us.
“Jesus!” Fletch said, startled. “What the hell is that?”
Calvin immediately stopped the Land Cruiser. And we all stared. At a  family of African porcupines, a couple of them at least a couple of feet  long, rambling across the rutted road.
“There aren’t porcupines in Africa, are there?” Fletch asked.
Crested porcupine, according to my wildlife guide, are the largest  rodents in East Africa. “Their mainly nocturnal habits make them rare to  see.” Well, good for us then.
The guide also said the belief that the quills can be shot by the  animal is a myth. Evidently what they do, if threatened, is stamp their  feet, click their teeth, and hiss at you (hmmm…sounds like an editor I  know). If that doesn’t work, “the porcupine runs backward until it rams  its attacker. The reverse charge is most effective because the  hindquarters are the most heavily armed and the quills are directed to  the rear.”
Brilliant. Click here for more.
Other photos you may enjoy:
North American Porcupine
Paraguayan Hairy Dwarf Porcupine
Lesser Hedgehog Tenrec

AFRICAN CRESTED PORCUPINE (Hystrix cristata) ©David Lansing

David Writes in his blog:
We were just bumbling along through the African bush in the darkness, going very slow both because it was difficult to see more than ten feet down the road…and because we weren’t at all sure where we were going. So we were all doing that thing you do at night when you’re a little bit lost on an unfamiliar road—leaning forwards and staring very intensely at the darkness directly in front of you. Suddenly there were several large black lumps moving across the road ten or twenty feet in front of us.

“Jesus!” Fletch said, startled. “What the hell is that?”

Calvin immediately stopped the Land Cruiser. And we all stared. At a family of African porcupines, a couple of them at least a couple of feet long, rambling across the rutted road.

“There aren’t porcupines in Africa, are there?” Fletch asked.

Crested porcupine, according to my wildlife guide, are the largest rodents in East Africa. “Their mainly nocturnal habits make them rare to see.” Well, good for us then.

The guide also said the belief that the quills can be shot by the animal is a myth. Evidently what they do, if threatened, is stamp their feet, click their teeth, and hiss at you (hmmm…sounds like an editor I know). If that doesn’t work, “the porcupine runs backward until it rams its attacker. The reverse charge is most effective because the hindquarters are the most heavily armed and the quills are directed to the rear.”

Brilliant. Click here for more.

Other photos you may enjoy:

North American Porcupine

Paraguayan Hairy Dwarf Porcupine

Lesser Hedgehog Tenrec

NET CASTING SPIDER (Deinopsis subrufa)  ©pbertner
Net casting spider/ogre faced spider/ gladiator spider  (Deinopsis sp.).  This spider goes by many names and the genus can be found throughout  the tropics. Deinopsis are unique amongst arachnids  in their predatory  methods. They remain suspended above branches or tree trunks with their  trapezoidal webs stretched between their four front legs. And like this  they wait. They wait until an insect passes below them, and then they  spring into action. Lightning fast they drop their sticky net on their  prey like a booby trap and entangle them before they deliver a quick  paralyzing bite which subdues them. Their large eyes help them to detect  and discriminate amongst insects. When disturbed, they stretch out and  allow their cryptic colouration to help them blend in with the tree  branches that they usually call home.
Other photos you may enjoy by the wonderful PBertner:
Lichen Huntsman Spider
Malachite Butterfly
Shieldbug and babies
Follow his misadventures here: http://pbertner.wordpress.com/

NET CASTING SPIDER (Deinopsis subrufa)  ©pbertner

Net casting spider/ogre faced spider/ gladiator spider (Deinopsis sp.). This spider goes by many names and the genus can be found throughout the tropics. Deinopsis are unique amongst arachnids in their predatory methods. They remain suspended above branches or tree trunks with their trapezoidal webs stretched between their four front legs. And like this they wait. They wait until an insect passes below them, and then they spring into action. Lightning fast they drop their sticky net on their prey like a booby trap and entangle them before they deliver a quick paralyzing bite which subdues them. Their large eyes help them to detect and discriminate amongst insects. When disturbed, they stretch out and allow their cryptic colouration to help them blend in with the tree branches that they usually call home.

Other photos you may enjoy by the wonderful PBertner:

Lichen Huntsman Spider

Malachite Butterfly

Shieldbug and babies

Follow his misadventures here: http://pbertner.wordpress.com/

CALIFORNIA SEA LION (Zalophus californianus)
Monterey Bay, California, USA  by Kevin Schafer, Seattle, Washington, USA / Smithsonian Institute “Monterey Bay is home to a large number of sea    lions, many of which spend the day resting on    rocky breakwaters at the entrance to the harbor.    Intensely social, they often huddle together or    use one another as mattresses or pillows. Here I    was struck by the  almost affectionate pose of    these two pups trying to grab a nap amid the     chaos of the haul-out.” 
Source: http://www.mnh.si.edu/exhibits/ocean%20views/gallery/sealions.html
—-
This past weekend we sailed over to Catalina and stayed in Cherry Cove which is a quiet harbor. On Saturday, there were more than a dozen sea lion cows swimming among the boats. We came face-to-face with the group as we came around the corner in our dinghy, and I’m not sure which if us was most surprised. One of our dogs had never seen a sea lion before and cocked her head in confusion, . After we checked each other out, we continued on our way.
Other photos you may enjoy:
"Laughing" Weddell Seal
Sea Lion “Say Ahhhhhhh”
Walrus

CALIFORNIA SEA LION (Zalophus californianus)

Monterey Bay, California, USA
by Kevin Schafer, Seattle, Washington, USA / Smithsonian Institute

“Monterey Bay is home to a large number of sea lions, many of which spend the day
resting on rocky breakwaters at the entrance to the harbor. Intensely social, they often
huddle together or use one another as mattresses or pillows. Here I was struck by the
almost affectionate pose of these two pups trying to grab a nap amid the
chaos of the haul-out.”

Source: http://www.mnh.si.edu/exhibits/ocean%20views/gallery/sealions.html

—-

This past weekend we sailed over to Catalina and stayed in Cherry Cove which is a quiet harbor. On Saturday, there were more than a dozen sea lion cows swimming among the boats. We came face-to-face with the group as we came around the corner in our dinghy, and I’m not sure which if us was most surprised. One of our dogs had never seen a sea lion before and cocked her head in confusion, . After we checked each other out, we continued on our way.

Other photos you may enjoy:

"Laughing" Weddell Seal

Sea Lion “Say Ahhhhhhh”

Walrus

Reblogged from allcreatures
SEA WALNUT or WARTY COMB (Mnemiopsis leidyi) ©Lars Johan Hansson
The warty comb jelly or sea walnut is a species of comb jelly, originally native to the western Atlantic coastal waters. They are small animals, having a maximum body length of roughly 7–12  centimetres (3–5 in) and a diameter of 2.5 centimetres (1 in)…but for the really interesting stuff, read below…
allcreatures:

Credit: Lars Johan Hansson. The stealthy predator Mnemiopsis leidyi, also known as the sea walnut, uses tiny hairs, called cilia, to create a current which prey don’t notice until they are sucked into its mouth region, surrounded by two large oral lobes. The sea walnut swims using fused cilia, which diffract light in many colors in this photo.

Other photos you may enjoy:
Flower Hat Jellyfish
Hydromedusa
Box Jellyfish

SEA WALNUT or WARTY COMB (Mnemiopsis leidyi) ©Lars Johan Hansson

The warty comb jelly or sea walnut is a species of comb jelly, originally native to the western Atlantic coastal waters. They are small animals, having a maximum body length of roughly 7–12 centimetres (3–5 in) and a diameter of 2.5 centimetres (1 in)…but for the really interesting stuff, read below…

allcreatures:

Credit: Lars Johan Hansson. The stealthy predator Mnemiopsis leidyi, also known as the sea walnut, uses tiny hairs, called cilia, to create a current which prey don’t notice until they are sucked into its mouth region, surrounded by two large oral lobes. The sea walnut swims using fused cilia, which diffract light in many colors in this photo.

Other photos you may enjoy:

Flower Hat Jellyfish

Hydromedusa

Box Jellyfish

NATURE CONSERVANCY is now on Tumblr. Check out their blog if you haven’t already. I don’t think they are in full-swing yet, but I think they have great potential! Plus, I love the header (above). http://natureconservancy.tumblr.com/
—-
Follow Friday:
I’ve never done a Follow Friday for this site. Here are few of my very favorite blogs — these folks work hard and go over and above to bring you animals that are out of the ordinary, or or that are out in the wild. Check them out if you haven’t already (click on their names to go to their site)
rhamphotheca
thebigcatblog
njwight
insectlove
mad-as-a-marine-biologist
—-
Also one side note, I love hearing from you guys! I do try to answer all of your questions. I have two questions now that I can’t answer1 . What do they eat? 2. Where do they live?
Since there’s no link to the post, or mention of which animal is being referred to, I can’t answer the question. So if you asked, please let me know which animal and I will answer…and  please do keep asking and suggesting animals — I like the really fancy and downright weird ones especially!
Thanks and Happy Friday/Saturday!

NATURE CONSERVANCY is now on Tumblr. Check out their blog if you haven’t already. I don’t think they are in full-swing yet, but I think they have great potential! Plus, I love the header (above). http://natureconservancy.tumblr.com/

—-

Follow Friday:

I’ve never done a Follow Friday for this site. Here are few of my very favorite blogs — these folks work hard and go over and above to bring you animals that are out of the ordinary, or or that are out in the wild. Check them out if you haven’t already (click on their names to go to their site)

rhamphotheca

thebigcatblog

njwight

insectlove

mad-as-a-marine-biologist

—-

Also one side note, I love hearing from you guys! I do try to answer all of your questions. I have two questions now that I can’t answer
1 . What do they eat?
2. Where do they live?

Since there’s no link to the post, or mention of which animal is being referred to, I can’t answer the question. So if you asked, please let me know which animal and I will answer…and  please do keep asking and suggesting animals — I like the really fancy and downright weird ones especially!

Thanks and Happy Friday/Saturday!

FIERY THROATED HUMMINGBIRD (Panterpe insignis) ©BirdQuest-Tours.com
Fiery-throated Hummingbird is a sometimes abundant regional endemic in  the Cerro de la Muerte highlands of Costa Rica and Western Panama. It is one of the 16 regional endemic  hummingbirds seen in the area
The food of this species is nectar, taken from a variety of small flowers, including epiphytic Ericaceae and bromeliads.  Like other hummingbirds it also takes small insects as an essential  source of protein.
Male Fiery-throated Hummingbird defend flowers and  scrubs in their feeding territories, and are dominant over most other  hummingbirds. They will, however, allow females to share their food  resources.
Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiery-throated_Hummingbird
Other photos you may enjoy:
Antillian Crested Hummingbird
Beautiful Hummingbird Species - unidentified
Long-tailed Sylph

FIERY THROATED HUMMINGBIRD (Panterpe insignis) ©BirdQuest-Tours.com

Fiery-throated Hummingbird is a sometimes abundant regional endemic in the Cerro de la Muerte highlands of Costa Rica and Western Panama. It is one of the 16 regional endemic hummingbirds seen in the area

The food of this species is nectar, taken from a variety of small flowers, including epiphytic Ericaceae and bromeliads. Like other hummingbirds it also takes small insects as an essential source of protein.

Male Fiery-throated Hummingbird defend flowers and scrubs in their feeding territories, and are dominant over most other hummingbirds. They will, however, allow females to share their food resources.

Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiery-throated_Hummingbird

Other photos you may enjoy:

Antillian Crested Hummingbird

Beautiful Hummingbird Species - unidentified

Long-tailed Sylph

ROSETTE NOSED CHAMELEON (Rhampholeon spinosus)  - ©Igor Siwanowicz
The Rosette-Nosed Chameleon is a  small East African species, found in virgin forest and woodland of both  the eastern and western Usambara Mountains. It is predominantly  ash-grey in colouration, with a distinctive rosette-like nasal  appendage.
This species has, in the past, caused much taxonomic controversy—and has been reclassified from Chamaeleo spinosum, to Bradypodion spinosum, to the current Rhampholeon spinosus.
Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosette-Nosed_Chameleon
Other photos you may enjoy:
Lance Nosed Chameleon
Baby Mountain Chameleon
Female Jackson’s Chameleon

ROSETTE NOSED CHAMELEON (Rhampholeon spinosus) - ©Igor Siwanowicz

The Rosette-Nosed Chameleon is a small East African species, found in virgin forest and woodland of both the eastern and western Usambara Mountains. It is predominantly ash-grey in colouration, with a distinctive rosette-like nasal appendage.

This species has, in the past, caused much taxonomic controversy—and has been reclassified from Chamaeleo spinosum, to Bradypodion spinosum, to the current Rhampholeon spinosus.

Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosette-Nosed_Chameleon

Other photos you may enjoy:

Lance Nosed Chameleon

Baby Mountain Chameleon

Female Jackson’s Chameleon

LIZARD ISLAND OCTOPUS (no scientific name found) ©Dr. Julian Finn
Another striking specimen discovered by the Marine Census of Life at the Great Barrier Reef’s Lizard Island was this octopus.
Other photos you may enjoy:
Blue Ringed Octopus 
Coconut or Veined Octopus
Coconut Octopus
Read more: http://www.thedailygreen.com/environmental-news/latest/strange-sea-animals-2#ixzz1KaUk5XPd

LIZARD ISLAND OCTOPUS (no scientific name found) ©Dr. Julian Finn

Another striking specimen discovered by the Marine Census of Life at the Great Barrier Reef’s Lizard Island was this octopus.

Other photos you may enjoy:

Blue Ringed Octopus

Coconut or Veined Octopus

Coconut Octopus


Read more: http://www.thedailygreen.com/environmental-news/latest/strange-sea-animals-2#ixzz1KaUk5XPd
BORNEAN CRESTED FIREBACK (Lophura ignita) ©Hamerton Park Zoo
This bird looks SO MUCH like a Japanese samuri to me — hair and all — that it made me laugh and I had to share it.
—-
The Crested Fireback is a medium-sized, forest pheasant with a peacock-like dark crest, bluish black plumage, reddish brown rump, black outer tail feathers, red iris and bare blue facial skin. The female is a brown bird with short crest, blue facial skin and spotted black-and-white below. The Crested Fireback is found in lowland forests of the Thai-Malay Peninsula, Borneo and Sumatra. 
The diet consists mainly of plants, fruits and small animals. The female usually lays between four to eight creamy white eggs.
Due to ongoing habitat loss and overhunting in some areas, the Crested Fireback is evaluated as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. It is listed on Appendix III of CITES in Malaysia.
Fact Source: http://www.hamertonzoopark.com/meet-the-animals/birds_p_to_z/
Other photos you may enjoy:
Golden Pheasant
Lady Amherst Pheasant
Mikado Pheasant

BORNEAN CRESTED FIREBACK (Lophura ignita) ©Hamerton Park Zoo

This bird looks SO MUCH like a Japanese samuri to me — hair and all — that it made me laugh and I had to share it.

—-

The Crested Fireback is a medium-sized, forest pheasant with a peacock-like dark crest, bluish black plumage, reddish brown rump, black outer tail feathers, red iris and bare blue facial skin. The female is a brown bird with short crest, blue facial skin and spotted black-and-white below. The Crested Fireback is found in lowland forests of the Thai-Malay Peninsula, Borneo and Sumatra. 

The diet consists mainly of plants, fruits and small animals. The female usually lays between four to eight creamy white eggs.

Due to ongoing habitat loss and overhunting in some areas, the Crested Fireback is evaluated as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. It is listed on Appendix III of CITES in Malaysia.

Fact Source: http://www.hamertonzoopark.com/meet-the-animals/birds_p_to_z/

Other photos you may enjoy:

Golden Pheasant

Lady Amherst Pheasant

Mikado Pheasant

NAPOLEON WRASSE or MAORI WRASSE (Cheilinus undulatus) ©Vassil
You can’t really beat the description of this creature from the Census  of Marine Life: “Exceeding 6 feet/two meters in length, the Napoleon Wrasse  is one of the largest reef fish found in the warm waters of the Indian  and Pacific oceans. The intricate blue-green design that decorates the  face resembles New Zealand Maori war paint, which is the root of its  alternative name, the Maori Wrasse. The designs are also unique to each  individual, much like fingerprints. A protogynous hermaphrodite, this  wrasse can change its sex from female to male.”
Other Photos you may enjoy:
Flasher Wrasse
Psychedelic Wrasse
Comet and Panther Grouper
Source: http://www.thedailygreen.com/environmental-news/latest/strange-sea-animals-2#ixzz1KaXi5XwU

NAPOLEON WRASSE or MAORI WRASSE (Cheilinus undulatus) ©Vassil

You can’t really beat the description of this creature from the Census of Marine Life: “Exceeding 6 feet/two meters in length, the Napoleon Wrasse is one of the largest reef fish found in the warm waters of the Indian and Pacific oceans. The intricate blue-green design that decorates the face resembles New Zealand Maori war paint, which is the root of its alternative name, the Maori Wrasse. The designs are also unique to each individual, much like fingerprints. A protogynous hermaphrodite, this wrasse can change its sex from female to male.”

Other Photos you may enjoy:

Flasher Wrasse

Psychedelic Wrasse

Comet and Panther Grouper


Source: http://www.thedailygreen.com/environmental-news/latest/strange-sea-animals-2#ixzz1KaXi5XwU

POLYCHAETE CARPET WORM (Vigtorniella ardabilia) ©Yoshihiro Fujiwara / JAMSTEC
Vigtorniella ardabilia is a species of annelid worm found on the sea floor in areas of organic enrichment. These habitats include the remains of dead whales on the sea floor (whale-falls) and areas of polluted sediment found underneath fish farms.
This  new species was only discovered and described in 2009. It was one of  many thousands of new marine species that are described every year.
One of the interesting things about Vigtorniella ardabilia is that it is what scientists term a cryptic species. These are species which appear morphologically the same as a closely-related species, and are distinguishable only on the basis of their DNA sequences.
The scientists decided to name the new ‘carpet worm’ species Vigtorniella ardabilia, after a carpet, the famous Ardabil carpet housed in the Victoria & Albert Museum.
Fact Source: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/nature-online/species-of-the-day/collections/collecting/vigtorniella-ardabilia/index.html
Other Photos you may enjoy:
Christmas Tree Worm
Swimba or bomb-dropping Worm
King Ragworm

POLYCHAETE CARPET WORM (Vigtorniella ardabilia) ©Yoshihiro Fujiwara / JAMSTEC

Vigtorniella ardabilia is a species of annelid worm found on the sea floor in areas of organic enrichment. These habitats include the remains of dead whales on the sea floor (whale-falls) and areas of polluted sediment found underneath fish farms.

This new species was only discovered and described in 2009. It was one of many thousands of new marine species that are described every year.

One of the interesting things about Vigtorniella ardabilia is that it is what scientists term a cryptic species. These are species which appear morphologically the same as a closely-related species, and are distinguishable only on the basis of their DNA sequences.

The scientists decided to name the new ‘carpet worm’ species Vigtorniella ardabilia, after a carpet, the famous Ardabil carpet housed in the Victoria & Albert Museum.

Fact Source: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/nature-online/species-of-the-day/collections/collecting/vigtorniella-ardabilia/index.html

Other Photos you may enjoy:

Christmas Tree Worm

Swimba or bomb-dropping Worm

King Ragworm