animals, animals, animals

Paying homage to the wonderful, unusual and diverse world of animals. I make no claim to content ownership. Sources are credited (with links) whenever possible — on both unique posts & re-blogs. Any post will be removed upon request (please provide URL link to the post/page). Enjoy! Email: animalworldtumblrblog@gmail.com Twitter: @animalworldtoo


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LEAF BEETLE (showing iridescence)Chrysolina fastuosa©zin.ru/ANIMALIA
Structural details of the chitinous exoskeleton are responsible for the iridescence shown here. Both larvae and adult (imago) beetles live by eating the leaves of the plant. 
This beetle is from Europe.
 Chrysolina fastuosa belongs to the group of insects with complete metamorphosis during development. The larvae are radically different from the adults in the lifestyle and physique. Between the larval stage and the adult stage is the pupal stage , a resting period, where the beetle inner and outer bodies change.
Fact Source: http://tinyurl.com/42v6jyv
Other photos you may like:
Iridescence in Nature
Boelen Pythons
Iridescent Beetles

LEAF BEETLE (showing iridescence)
Chrysolina fastuosa
©zin.ru/ANIMALIA

Structural details of the chitinous exoskeleton are responsible for the iridescence shown here. Both larvae and adult (imago) beetles live by eating the leaves of the plant.

This beetle is from Europe.

Chrysolina fastuosa belongs to the group of insects with complete metamorphosis during development. The larvae are radically different from the adults in the lifestyle and physique. Between the larval stage and the adult stage is the pupal stage , a resting period, where the beetle inner and outer bodies change.

Fact Source: http://tinyurl.com/42v6jyv

Other photos you may like:

Iridescence in Nature

Boelen Pythons

Iridescent Beetles

Reblogged from rhamphotheca
PINE PROCESSIONARY MOTH CATERPILLARThaumetopoea pityocampa©Jürgen Appel
Another excellent find Rhampotheca.
rhamphotheca:

Pine Processionary Moth caterpillars (Thaumetopoea pityocampa)
The larva of this moth is considered a major forest pest in southern Europe, living communally in large “tents”, usually in pine trees but occasionally in cedar or larch, marching out at night in single file (hence the common name) to feed on the needles. There are often several such tents in a single tree. When they are ready to pupate, the larvae march in their usual fashion to the ground, where they disperse to pupate singly on or just below the surface. The larvae should never be handled as the abundant hairs on their bodies cause extreme irritation to the skin…
(read more: Wikipedia)   (photo: Jürgen Appel)

PINE PROCESSIONARY MOTH CATERPILLAR
Thaumetopoea pityocampa
©
Jürgen Appel

Another excellent find Rhampotheca.

rhamphotheca:

Pine Processionary Moth caterpillars (Thaumetopoea pityocampa)

The larva of this moth is considered a major forest pest in southern Europe, living communally in large “tents”, usually in pine trees but occasionally in cedar or larch, marching out at night in single file (hence the common name) to feed on the needles. There are often several such tents in a single tree. When they are ready to pupate, the larvae march in their usual fashion to the ground, where they disperse to pupate singly on or just below the surface. The larvae should never be handled as the abundant hairs on their bodies cause extreme irritation to the skin…

(read more: Wikipedia)   (photo: Jürgen Appel)

ORANGE TIP BUTTERFLYAnthocharis cardamines by stefady78
The Orange Tip is a Butterfly in the Pieridae family.
So named because of the male’s bright orange tips to his forewings [it’s been cropped out in the photo above]. The  males are a common sight in spring flying along hedgerows and damp  meadows in search of the more reclusive female which lacks the orange  and is often mistaken for one of the other ‘White’ butterflies. The  undersides are mottled green and white and create a superb camouflage  when settled on flowerheads such as Cow Parsley and Garlic Mustard Alliaria petiolata.  The male is able to hide his orange tips by tucking the forwings behind  the hindwings at rest.
If you look closely at the wing mottling you will see  that the green colour is in fact made up of a mixture of black and  yellow scales. 
It is found across Europe, and eastwards into temperate Asia as far as Japan.  The past 30 years has seen a rapid increase in the range of the Orange  Tip in the UK particularly in Scotland and Ireland, probably in response  to climate change.
Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orange_Tip
Other photos that you may like:
Madagascan Sunset Moth - Close-up of Sunset Moth Scales
Rice Paper Butterfly
Moth Wing Scales

ORANGE TIP BUTTERFLY
Anthocharis cardamines 
by stefady78

The Orange Tip is a Butterfly in the Pieridae family.

So named because of the male’s bright orange tips to his forewings [it’s been cropped out in the photo above]. The males are a common sight in spring flying along hedgerows and damp meadows in search of the more reclusive female which lacks the orange and is often mistaken for one of the other ‘White’ butterflies. The undersides are mottled green and white and create a superb camouflage when settled on flowerheads such as Cow Parsley and Garlic Mustard Alliaria petiolata. The male is able to hide his orange tips by tucking the forwings behind the hindwings at rest.

If you look closely at the wing mottling you will see that the green colour is in fact made up of a mixture of black and yellow scales.

It is found across Europe, and eastwards into temperate Asia as far as Japan. The past 30 years has seen a rapid increase in the range of the Orange Tip in the UK particularly in Scotland and Ireland, probably in response to climate change.

Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orange_Tip

Other photos that you may like:

Madagascan Sunset Moth - Close-up of Sunset Moth Scales

Rice Paper Butterfly

Moth Wing Scales

CROWNED SLUG CATERPILLARLepidoptera: Limacodidae©williamfisherphotography.com
Here’s a beauty of a caterpillar. The crowned slug displays its spines  like the feathered headpiece of a Vegas showgirl. The stinging setae  line the crowned slug’s perimeter, decorating its flattened, green body.  Later instars may also be marked with colorful red or yellow spots along the caterpillar’s back.
Though variations are found in woodlands, from Florida to Mississippi, north all the way to Minnesota, southern Ontario, and Massachusetts, this beauty appears to be from Costa Rica.
Fact Source:http://insects.about.com/od/butterfliesmoths/ig/Stinging-Caterpillars/Crowned-Slug-Caterpillar.htm
Other photos you may like:
Similar Crowned Slug Caterpillar
Tufted Costa Rican Caterpillar
Hag Moth Caterpillar
Puss Caterpillar

CROWNED SLUG CATERPILLAR
Lepidoptera: Limacodidae
©williamfisherphotography.com

Here’s a beauty of a caterpillar. The crowned slug displays its spines like the feathered headpiece of a Vegas showgirl. The stinging setae line the crowned slug’s perimeter, decorating its flattened, green body. Later instars may also be marked with colorful red or yellow spots along the caterpillar’s back.

Though variations are found in woodlands, from Florida to Mississippi, north all the way to Minnesota, southern Ontario, and Massachusetts, this beauty appears to be from Costa Rica.

Fact Source:
http://insects.about.com/od/butterfliesmoths/ig/Stinging-Caterpillars/Crowned-Slug-Caterpillar.htm

Other photos you may like:

Similar Crowned Slug Caterpillar

Tufted Costa Rican Caterpillar

Hag Moth Caterpillar

Puss Caterpillar

PARADISE TREE SNAKE or FLYING SNAKEChrysopelea paradisi©thailandsnakes.com
Chrysopelea, or more commonly known as the flying snake, is a genus that belongs to the family Colubridae. Flying snakes are mildly venomous, but they’re considered harmless as their toxicity is not dangerous to humans. Their range is in Southeast Asia
This flying snake species reaches up to three feet in length and is  popular in the European pet trade. Their bodies are black, but covered  in rich green scales. Clusters of red, orange and yellow-colored scales  in the shape of flower petals line the dorsal area from the base of the  neck to the tail. This is the most well-known coloration, but some  specimens may exhibit fully-green coloration without any bright dorsal  markings. Their gliding ability is considered one of the best among the  flying snakes. 
Chrysopelea are diurnal so they hunt during the day. Prey includes lizards, frogs, birds and bats.
Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chrysopelea
Other photos you may like:
Green Vine Snake
Variable Bush Viper
Mosambique Spitting Cobra

PARADISE TREE SNAKE or FLYING SNAKE
Chrysopelea paradisi
©thailandsnakes.com

Chrysopelea, or more commonly known as the flying snake, is a genus that belongs to the family Colubridae. Flying snakes are mildly venomous, but they’re considered harmless as their toxicity is not dangerous to humans. Their range is in Southeast Asia

This flying snake species reaches up to three feet in length and is popular in the European pet trade. Their bodies are black, but covered in rich green scales. Clusters of red, orange and yellow-colored scales in the shape of flower petals line the dorsal area from the base of the neck to the tail. This is the most well-known coloration, but some specimens may exhibit fully-green coloration without any bright dorsal markings. Their gliding ability is considered one of the best among the flying snakes. 

Chrysopelea are diurnal so they hunt during the day. Prey includes lizards, frogs, birds and bats.

Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chrysopelea

Other photos you may like:

Green Vine Snake

Variable Bush Viper

Mosambique Spitting Cobra

PROBOSCIS MONKEY SleepingNasalis larvatus© Films4Conservation/Cockroach Productions
The monkey also goes by the Malay name monyet belanda (“Dutch monkey”), or even orang belanda (“Dutchman”), as Indonesians noticed that the Dutch colonisers often had a similarly large belly and nose.
The big nose is thought to be used to  attract females and is a characteristic of the males, reaching up to  7 inches in length. The females also have big noses compared to other  monkey species, but not as big as the males. Also, when the animal becomes agitated its nose swells with blood, making  warning calls louder and more intense.
Proboscis monkey males are much larger than females, weighing up to 24 kg (53 lb) and  reaching 72 cm (28 in) with a tail an additional 73cm long.  Females are up to 60 cm long, weighing up to 12 kg (26 lb). This  difference is greater than in any other primate.
The adult Proboscis monkey is mainly reddish-brown, with grayish limbs. Young Proboscis monkeys have a blue face, blackish fur and a relatively  normal sized nose at birth. As they grow older, fur coloration changes  and the nose grows.
Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proboscis_monkey
Other monkey photos I love:
Mandrill
Red-Shanked Douc
Diana Monkey

PROBOSCIS MONKEY Sleeping
Nasalis larvatus
© Films4Conservation/Cockroach Productions

The monkey also goes by the Malay name monyet belanda (“Dutch monkey”), or even orang belanda (“Dutchman”), as Indonesians noticed that the Dutch colonisers often had a similarly large belly and nose.

The big nose is thought to be used to attract females and is a characteristic of the males, reaching up to 7 inches in length. The females also have big noses compared to other monkey species, but not as big as the males. Also, when the animal becomes agitated its nose swells with blood, making warning calls louder and more intense.

Proboscis monkey males are much larger than females, weighing up to 24 kg (53 lb) and reaching 72 cm (28 in) with a tail an additional 73cm long. Females are up to 60 cm long, weighing up to 12 kg (26 lb). This difference is greater than in any other primate.

The adult Proboscis monkey is mainly reddish-brown, with grayish limbs. Young Proboscis monkeys have a blue face, blackish fur and a relatively normal sized nose at birth. As they grow older, fur coloration changes and the nose grows.

Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proboscis_monkey

Other monkey photos I love:

Mandrill

Red-Shanked Douc

Diana Monkey

Reblogged from sharksssss-deactivated20111006
WHITE SPOTTED BAMBOO SHARK (in egg cases)Chiloscyllium plagiosum©Oceanwideimages.com 
Whitespotted Bamboo Shark eggcases showing well formed pups inside. Also  known as White-spotted Catshark. Found on coral reefs throughout the  Pacific Ocean
The whitespotted bamboo shark is a carpet shark with an adult size that approaches one metre in length.  This small, mostly nocturnal species is harmless to humans. The  whitespotted bamboo shark is occasionally kept as a pet in larger home  aquariums. It can grow up to 93 centimetres (37 in) long.
Whitespotted bamboo sharks are oviparous (egg laying-see egg case above). The eggs are approximately five inches long and hatch after 14 or 15 weeks. The young hatch out at approximately 6 inches in length.  Doug Sweet, curator of fishes at the Belle Isle Aquarium in Detroit  reports that in July 2002 a clutch of eggs from a female whitespotted  bamboo shark hatched without any apparent fertilization. This appears to be the first reported example of parthenogenesis in this species.
Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whitespotted_bamboo_shark
Other photos you may like:
Walking Shark
Angel Shark swallowing a Dog Shark (it gets spit out again)
Green Sawfish

WHITE SPOTTED BAMBOO SHARK (in egg cases)
Chiloscyllium plagiosum
©Oceanwideimages.com
 

Whitespotted Bamboo Shark eggcases showing well formed pups inside. Also known as White-spotted Catshark. Found on coral reefs throughout the Pacific Ocean

The whitespotted bamboo shark is a carpet shark with an adult size that approaches one metre in length. This small, mostly nocturnal species is harmless to humans. The whitespotted bamboo shark is occasionally kept as a pet in larger home aquariums. It can grow up to 93 centimetres (37 in) long.

Whitespotted bamboo sharks are oviparous (egg laying-see egg case above). The eggs are approximately five inches long and hatch after 14 or 15 weeks. The young hatch out at approximately 6 inches in length. Doug Sweet, curator of fishes at the Belle Isle Aquarium in Detroit reports that in July 2002 a clutch of eggs from a female whitespotted bamboo shark hatched without any apparent fertilization. This appears to be the first reported example of parthenogenesis in this species.

Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whitespotted_bamboo_shark

Other photos you may like:

Walking Shark

Angel Shark swallowing a Dog Shark (it gets spit out again)

Green Sawfish

(via )

GREAT ARGUS PHEASANTArgusianus argus©Jeff Monroe
The Great Argus, (also known as Phoenix in  some Asian areas) is a brown-plumaged  pheasant with a small blue head  and neck. The male is  among the largest of all pheasants, up to 6-1/2  feet/200cm in length. It has  very long tail feathers. The male’s most spectacular features are its  huge, broad and greatly  elongated secondary wing feathers decorated with  large ocelli (eyes -  see the Peacock Pheasant here or below).  The female is smaller and duller than male, with shorter tail.
The Great Argus is distributed in the jungles of southeast Asia. It  feeds on the forest floor in early morning and evening. Unusual among  Galliformes (which include peafowl), the Great Argus has no oil gland  and the hen lays only two eggs.
Despite displays similar to polygamous birds, the Great  Argus is actually  monogamous.
The scientific name of the Great Argus was given by Carolus Linnaeus in reference to the many eyes-like pattern on its wings. Argus is a hundred-eyed giant in Greek mythology.
Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Argus_Pheasant
Other photos you may like:
Great Argus Pheasant
Grey Peacock Pheasant
Oscellated Turkey

GREAT ARGUS PHEASANT
Argusianus argus
©Jeff Monroe

The Great Argus, (also known as Phoenix in some Asian areas) is a brown-plumaged pheasant with a small blue head and neck. The male is among the largest of all pheasants, up to 6-1/2 feet/200cm in length. It has very long tail feathers. The male’s most spectacular features are its huge, broad and greatly elongated secondary wing feathers decorated with large ocelli (eyes - see the Peacock Pheasant here or below). The female is smaller and duller than male, with shorter tail.

The Great Argus is distributed in the jungles of southeast Asia. It feeds on the forest floor in early morning and evening. Unusual among Galliformes (which include peafowl), the Great Argus has no oil gland and the hen lays only two eggs.

Despite displays similar to polygamous birds, the Great Argus is actually monogamous.

The scientific name of the Great Argus was given by Carolus Linnaeus in reference to the many eyes-like pattern on its wings. Argus is a hundred-eyed giant in Greek mythology.

Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Argus_Pheasant

Other photos you may like:

Great Argus Pheasant

Grey Peacock Pheasant

Oscellated Turkey

Reblogged from atheisnt
GREATER INDIAN FRUIT BAT or INDIAN FLYING FOXPteropus giganteus©ilikefish/Jon Read
The Indian Flying-fox is a species of megabat in the Pteropodidae family. It is found in Bangladesh, China, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. This photo was shot in the Maldives.
It is also known as the Greater Indian Fruit Bat,  it lives in mainly forests. It is a very large bat with a wing span of  between 1.2 and 1.5 meters (4-5 feet). It is nocturnal and feeds mainly  on ripe fruits such as mangoes and bananas and nectar.
This bat is gregarious and lives in colonies which can number a few  hundred. Their offspring has no specific name besides ‘young’. They  reproduce sexually and give live birth. They have one to two young. The  Indian Flying-Fox lives in tropical forests and swamps, where there is a  large body of water nearby.
Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Flying-fox
Other photos you may like:
Egyptian Fruit Bat or Flying Fox
Indian Flying Fox
Baby Flying Foxes

GREATER INDIAN FRUIT BAT or INDIAN FLYING FOX
Pteropus giganteus
©ilikefish/Jon Read

The Indian Flying-fox is a species of megabat in the Pteropodidae family. It is found in Bangladesh, China, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. This photo was shot in the Maldives.

It is also known as the Greater Indian Fruit Bat, it lives in mainly forests. It is a very large bat with a wing span of between 1.2 and 1.5 meters (4-5 feet). It is nocturnal and feeds mainly on ripe fruits such as mangoes and bananas and nectar.

This bat is gregarious and lives in colonies which can number a few hundred. Their offspring has no specific name besides ‘young’. They reproduce sexually and give live birth. They have one to two young. The Indian Flying-Fox lives in tropical forests and swamps, where there is a large body of water nearby.

Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Flying-fox

Other photos you may like:

Egyptian Fruit Bat or Flying Fox

Indian Flying Fox

Baby Flying Foxes

DROMEDARY CAMEL (portrait)Camelus dromedariusAustralia Zoo - Beerwah, Queensland, Australia© Barbara J H
A large even-toed ungulate with one hump on its back. Its native range is unclear, but it was probably the Arabian Peninsula. The domesticated form occurs widely in North Africa and the Middle East; the world’s only population of dromedaries exhibiting wild behaviour is an introduced feral population in Australia.
The dromedary camel is a member of the camel family. Other members of the camel family include the llama and the alpaca in South America. The Dromedary has one hump on its back, in contrast to the Bactrian camel which has two. 
An Easy way to tell the two species camels apart is to lay the first letter of each (B and D) on its side - the D has one hump as does the Dromedary camel, the B has Two humps as does the Bactrian.
Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dromedary
Other photos you may like:
Perspective — Dromedary Camel and sand dune, Southern Sahara
Bactrian or 2-humped Camel
Melanistic (black) Dromedary Camel

DROMEDARY CAMEL (portrait)
Camelus dromedarius
Australia Zoo - Beerwah, Queensland, Australia
© Barbara J H

A large even-toed ungulate with one hump on its back. Its native range is unclear, but it was probably the Arabian Peninsula. The domesticated form occurs widely in North Africa and the Middle East; the world’s only population of dromedaries exhibiting wild behaviour is an introduced feral population in Australia.

The dromedary camel is a member of the camel family. Other members of the camel family include the llama and the alpaca in South America. The Dromedary has one hump on its back, in contrast to the Bactrian camel which has two.

An Easy way to tell the two species camels apart is to lay the first letter of each (B and D) on its side - the D has one hump as does the Dromedary camel, the B has Two humps as does the Bactrian.

Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dromedary

Other photos you may like:

Perspective — Dromedary Camel and sand dune, Southern Sahara

Bactrian or 2-humped Camel

Melanistic (black) Dromedary Camel

LEAF-NOSED LIZARDCeratophora tennentii©cheranga.d
The Leaf-nosed Lizard or Tennent’s Leaf-nosed Lizard (Ceratophora tennentii) is a species of lizard in the Agamidae family. It is endemic to Sri Lanka.
The arboreal leaf-nosed lizard, also known as the “horn-nosed lizard” or  “Horned lizard”, has a leaf-like appendage on the end of its nose, the  species can reach lengths of over 8 inches including the tail. The Latin  word for which it was named, Ceratophora, means horn bearer. The males  usually have more green in their coloration than females seem to have,  although they can change color to a reddish brown. The females usually  have shorter appendages on their nose. These lizards are not very agile  and rely more on their coloration to avoid predators rather than speed. The lizard is only active during the day. Very little is actually known about this unusual lizard.
Found in the wet tropical montane cloud forests of the Knuckles mountains in Sri Lanka, although they have been recorded in several other forest habitats. It is thought to eat insects.
Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leaf-nosed_Lizard
Other photos you may like:
Rosette-Nosed Chameleon
Lance-nosed Chameleon
Tentacled Snake

LEAF-NOSED LIZARD
Ceratophora tennentii
©cheranga.d

The Leaf-nosed Lizard or Tennent’s Leaf-nosed Lizard (Ceratophora tennentii) is a species of lizard in the Agamidae family. It is endemic to Sri Lanka.

The arboreal leaf-nosed lizard, also known as the “horn-nosed lizard” or “Horned lizard”, has a leaf-like appendage on the end of its nose, the species can reach lengths of over 8 inches including the tail. The Latin word for which it was named, Ceratophora, means horn bearer. The males usually have more green in their coloration than females seem to have, although they can change color to a reddish brown. The females usually have shorter appendages on their nose. These lizards are not very agile and rely more on their coloration to avoid predators rather than speed. The lizard is only active during the day. Very little is actually known about this unusual lizard.

Found in the wet tropical montane cloud forests of the Knuckles mountains in Sri Lanka, although they have been recorded in several other forest habitats. It is thought to eat insects.

Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leaf-nosed_Lizard

Other photos you may like:

Rosette-Nosed Chameleon

Lance-nosed Chameleon

Tentacled Snake

RED BIRD OF PARADISEParadisaea rubra, also Cendrawasih Merah©Tim Laman - National Geographic
Red Bird-of-paradise is a bird in the genus Paradisaea, family Paradisaeidae.
Large, up to 33 cm long, brown and yellow with a dark brown iris, grey legs and yellow bill. The male has an emerald green face, a pair of elongated black corkscrew-shaped  tail wires, dark green feather pompoms above each eye and a train of  glossy crimson red plumes with whitish tips at either side of the  breast. The male measures up to 72 cm long, including the ornamental red  plumes that require at least six years to fully attain. The female is  similar but smaller in size, with a dark brown face and has no  ornamental red plumes. The diet consists mainly of fruits, berries and arthropods.
An Indonesian endemic, the Red Bird-of-paradise is distributed to lowland rainforests of Waigeo and Batanta islands of West Papua. This species shares its home with another bird-of-paradise, the Wilson’s Bird-of-paradise. Hybridisation between these two species is not recorded but is expected because it is recorded for many other birds of paradise.
Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Bird-of-paradise
Other photos you may like:
Red Bird of Paradise
Lesser Bird of Paradise
Guianan Cock of the Rock

RED BIRD OF PARADISE
Paradisaea rubra, also Cendrawasih Merah
©Tim Laman - National Geographic

Red Bird-of-paradise is a bird in the genus Paradisaea, family Paradisaeidae.

Large, up to 33 cm long, brown and yellow with a dark brown iris, grey legs and yellow bill. The male has an emerald green face, a pair of elongated black corkscrew-shaped tail wires, dark green feather pompoms above each eye and a train of glossy crimson red plumes with whitish tips at either side of the breast. The male measures up to 72 cm long, including the ornamental red plumes that require at least six years to fully attain. The female is similar but smaller in size, with a dark brown face and has no ornamental red plumes. The diet consists mainly of fruits, berries and arthropods.

An Indonesian endemic, the Red Bird-of-paradise is distributed to lowland rainforests of Waigeo and Batanta islands of West Papua. This species shares its home with another bird-of-paradise, the Wilson’s Bird-of-paradise. Hybridisation between these two species is not recorded but is expected because it is recorded for many other birds of paradise.

Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Bird-of-paradise

Other photos you may like:

Red Bird of Paradise

Lesser Bird of Paradise

Guianan Cock of the Rock

SUMATRAN ELEPHANTElephas maximus sumatranus©photo credit?

They can only be found on Sumatra and  nowhere else. They are much smaller than the Indian Elephant  and their  population is estimated in the 2,500. They populate forests and  half-wooded habitats.
Weight: 6,600
Height: 3, 5 m (11 feet)
For Anonymous who asked: Have you done any posts about elephants? If so, could you link to it and  if now, PLZ DO!! I love your site 
Sure! I’ve been fortunate to see both Asian and African Elephants in the wild and they are amazing creatures. I realized that I’ve really focused more on African Elephants so this for the Asian Elephants.
Asian Elephant tend to eat in the twilight periods and spend their days  resting. Their diet consists mainly of grass, vines, bark and leaves but  extents to human cultivated crops and fruit which causes a high level  of conflict between Asian Elephant and farmers. Asian Elephant’s play a  vital role in the forest ecosystem from digging up water holes that  other animals will use and even the paths they make through the forest  act as fire breakers. It would be a catastrophic loss if these titanic  elephants were to become extinst and with numbers dropping to between 35  – 50,000 left in the world it is indeed a possibility.
Asian Elephants can be easily distinguished from its African cousin  by its curved back, smaller ears and unique dual dome type  structures on its head. Asian Elephant’s are a gray/brown color  and are covered in thin coarse hairs with a trunk that differs slightly  from the African elephant. Occasionally, the Asian Elephant may be spotted  with pink blotches on its skin usually around the face, these are  common skin pigment deficiencies. Male Asian Elephant’s can be up to twice the size. Female  Asian Elephant’s may also lack tusks completely.
Fact Source: http://www.itsnature.org/endangered/asian-elephant/
Other posts you may like:
Elephant Romance
Bull African Elephant
African Elephant

SUMATRAN ELEPHANT
Elephas maximus sumatranus
©photo credit?

They can only be found on Sumatra and nowhere else. They are much smaller than the Indian Elephant and their population is estimated in the 2,500. They populate forests and half-wooded habitats.

Weight: 6,600

Height: 3, 5 m (11 feet)

For Anonymous who asked: Have you done any posts about elephants? If so, could you link to it and if now, PLZ DO!! I love your site

Sure! I’ve been fortunate to see both Asian and African Elephants in the wild and they are amazing creatures. I realized that I’ve really focused more on African Elephants so this for the Asian Elephants.

Asian Elephant tend to eat in the twilight periods and spend their days resting. Their diet consists mainly of grass, vines, bark and leaves but extents to human cultivated crops and fruit which causes a high level of conflict between Asian Elephant and farmers. Asian Elephant’s play a vital role in the forest ecosystem from digging up water holes that other animals will use and even the paths they make through the forest act as fire breakers. It would be a catastrophic loss if these titanic elephants were to become extinst and with numbers dropping to between 35 – 50,000 left in the world it is indeed a possibility.

Asian Elephants can be easily distinguished from its African cousin by its curved back, smaller ears and unique dual dome type structures on its head. Asian Elephant’s are a gray/brown color and are covered in thin coarse hairs with a trunk that differs slightly from the African elephant. Occasionally, the Asian Elephant may be spotted with pink blotches on its skin usually around the face, these are common skin pigment deficiencies. Male Asian Elephant’s can be up to twice the size. Female Asian Elephant’s may also lack tusks completely.

Fact Source: http://www.itsnature.org/endangered/asian-elephant/

Other posts you may like:

Elephant Romance

Bull African Elephant

African Elephant

BALI STINK BUG Nymph Family Tessaratomidae©Richard-Seaman.com
Awful name but an interesting looking bug and nice coloring…
This 			is probably one of the last bugs you want to meet.   It’s a juvenile 			Tessaratomid bug, belonging to a family which is closely related to the 			stink bugs.   Judging from the smell, it’s fairly clear that 			this bug also uses foul smells as a defense - those four lumps on its back 			are the outlets of the stink glands, and it didn’t hesitate to use them 			on me! The juveniles or “nymphs” of bugs are easy to recognize 			because they have undeveloped wings.   As a bug sheds its skin 			and goes from “instar” to “instar”, the wings become more and more developed 			until the final “instar” turns into the adult “imago”. —Richard Seaman
Fact Source: http://www.richard-seaman.com/Arthropods/Indonesia/Highlights/index.html
Other photos that you might like:
Shield Bug with “Elvis” Face
Red Cotton Stainer
Mallotus Shield Bugs

BALI STINK BUG Nymph
Family Tessaratomidae
©Richard-Seaman.com

Awful name but an interesting looking bug and nice coloring…

This is probably one of the last bugs you want to meet.   It’s a juvenile Tessaratomid bug, belonging to a family which is closely related to the stink bugs.   Judging from the smell, it’s fairly clear that this bug also uses foul smells as a defense - those four lumps on its back are the outlets of the stink glands, and it didn’t hesitate to use them on me! The juveniles or “nymphs” of bugs are easy to recognize because they have undeveloped wings.   As a bug sheds its skin and goes from “instar” to “instar”, the wings become more and more developed until the final “instar” turns into the adult “imago”. —Richard Seaman

Fact Source:
http://www.richard-seaman.com/Arthropods/Indonesia/Highlights/index.html

Other photos that you might like:

Shield Bug with “Elvis” Face

Red Cotton Stainer

Mallotus Shield Bugs

SPECTACLED HARE WALLABY (Lagorchestes conspicillatus) 
© Jean-Paul Ferrero / www.ardea.com
A mask of orange-coloured fur around each eye provides the spectacled  hare-wallaby with its common name, while the fur on the back and sides  is brown with white tips. The underparts have contrasting fluffy, white  fur, and a distinctive line of white fur also runs along the hip. The scientific name of this species, Lagorchestes, means ‘dancing hare’, and it does indeed resemble a hare in its movements.
Within its range the spectacled hare-wallaby inhabits a variety of  environments including open forests, woodlands, shrublands and  grasslands. It requires dense clumps (tussocks) of grass or small mounds (hummocks) of spinifex grass (Triodia angusta), under which it shelters during the heat of the day
Fact Source:http://www.arkive.org/spectacled-hare-wallaby/lagorchestes-conspicillatus/image-G35784.html#text=Habitat
Other photos you might like:
Boat full of kangaroos
Numbat
Brush-tailed Bettong

SPECTACLED HARE WALLABY (Lagorchestes conspicillatus)

© Jean-Paul Ferrero / www.ardea.com

A mask of orange-coloured fur around each eye provides the spectacled hare-wallaby with its common name, while the fur on the back and sides is brown with white tips. The underparts have contrasting fluffy, white fur, and a distinctive line of white fur also runs along the hip. The scientific name of this species, Lagorchestes, means ‘dancing hare’, and it does indeed resemble a hare in its movements.

Within its range the spectacled hare-wallaby inhabits a variety of environments including open forests, woodlands, shrublands and grasslands. It requires dense clumps (tussocks) of grass or small mounds (hummocks) of spinifex grass (Triodia angusta), under which it shelters during the heat of the day

Fact Source:
http://www.arkive.org/spectacled-hare-wallaby/lagorchestes-conspicillatus/image-G35784.html#text=Habitat

Other photos you might like:

Boat full of kangaroos

Numbat

Brush-tailed Bettong