animals, animals, animals

Paying homage to the wonderful, unusual and diverse world of animals. I make no claim to content ownership. Sources are credited (with links) whenever possible — on both unique posts & re-blogs. Any post will be removed upon request (please provide URL link to the post/page). Enjoy! Email: animalworldtumblrblog@gmail.com Twitter: @animalworldtoo


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Arctic RIBBON SEALHistriophoca fasciata© NOAA / Michael Cameron via AP
Recently a Ribbon Seal was discovered sleeping on a dock in Seattle, Washington, USA. “I thought, ‘That’s an interesting-looking creature,’” Cleland told OurAmazingPlanet. “I had no idea what it was.”
A quick glance through a book in his office soon revealed it was a ribbon seal, an Arctic species that spends most of its life at sea, swimming the frigid waters off Alaska and Russia — which is where the pictured adult male ribbon seal was photographed in 2005.
Satellite tracking studies have  revealed that ribbon seals do sometimes make it as far as the north  Pacific Ocean, south of the Aleutian islands, but much about the species  remains mysterious. Because they spend so much of their lives in the  open water, it’s a challenge to track them.
"Unfortunately we don’t know a lot about their numbers," Boveng said. "There’s never been a reliable survey."The Seattle ribbon seal appears to be only the second on record to make it so far south.
In 1962, a ribbon seal showed up on a beach near Morro Bay, Calif., a  town about 200 miles (320 kilometers) north of Los Angeles. According to  contemporary reports, the seal was in good shape, but totally bald  except for hair on the head, neck and flippers. It died a month later at  the local aquarium.
The Seattle ribbon seal’s story is unknown, but one could be forgiven  for thinking it a harbinger of things to come. This week, cold winds  from Alaska helped create a record winter storm in Seattle, slamming the metro area with 4 to 8 inches (10 to 20 centimeters) of snow. Source
Other posts:
Arctic Wolves
Arctic Fox
Peregrine Falcon

Arctic RIBBON SEAL
Histriophoca fasciata
© NOAA / Michael Cameron via AP

Recently a Ribbon Seal was discovered sleeping on a dock in Seattle, Washington, USA. “I thought, ‘That’s an interesting-looking creature,’” Cleland told OurAmazingPlanet. “I had no idea what it was.”

A quick glance through a book in his office soon revealed it was a ribbon seal, an Arctic species that spends most of its life at sea, swimming the frigid waters off Alaska and Russia — which is where the pictured adult male ribbon seal was photographed in 2005.

Satellite tracking studies have revealed that ribbon seals do sometimes make it as far as the north Pacific Ocean, south of the Aleutian islands, but much about the species remains mysterious. Because they spend so much of their lives in the open water, it’s a challenge to track them.

"Unfortunately we don’t know a lot about their numbers," Boveng said. "There’s never been a reliable survey."The Seattle ribbon seal appears to be only the second on record to make it so far south.

In 1962, a ribbon seal showed up on a beach near Morro Bay, Calif., a town about 200 miles (320 kilometers) north of Los Angeles. According to contemporary reports, the seal was in good shape, but totally bald except for hair on the head, neck and flippers. It died a month later at the local aquarium.

The Seattle ribbon seal’s story is unknown, but one could be forgiven for thinking it a harbinger of things to come. This week, cold winds from Alaska helped create a record winter storm in Seattle, slamming the metro area with 4 to 8 inches (10 to 20 centimeters) of snow. Source

Other posts:

Arctic Wolves

Arctic Fox

Peregrine Falcon

BLUE WEEVILEupholus bennetti© Seth Resnick
Eupholus is a genus of beetle in the family Curculionidae.  The genus includes some of the most colourful of the weevils. The  colour may serve as a warning to predators that they are distasteful.  Most species feed upon yam leaves, some of which are toxic to other  animals. The species occur in New Guinea and adjacent islands. Source
Other posts:
The long necked wonder - the Giraffe Weevil
Pleasing Fungus Beetle
Yellow Weevil

BLUE WEEVIL
Eupholus bennetti
© Seth Resnick

Eupholus is a genus of beetle in the family Curculionidae. The genus includes some of the most colourful of the weevils. The colour may serve as a warning to predators that they are distasteful. Most species feed upon yam leaves, some of which are toxic to other animals. The species occur in New Guinea and adjacent islands. Source

Other posts:

The long necked wonder - the Giraffe Weevil

Pleasing Fungus Beetle

Yellow Weevil

Plush/stuffed BLUE WEEVILEupholus bennetti©Weird Bug Lady / Brigette Zacharczenko
This blue weevil is one of the most strikingly beautiful insects around!It occurs in Papau New Guinea and surrounding islands.
—-
I came across Brigette /The Weird Bug Lady's site and the unusual, fun, and cool stuffed insects that she makes. She is an entomology graduate student and crafter. She makes plush bugs while she is in graduate school studying the real ones. Need a stuffed Caddis Fly? Garden Slug? Silverfish? - the Weird Bug Lady is your gal. These are awesome!

Plush/stuffed BLUE WEEVIL
Eupholus bennetti
©Weird Bug Lady / Brigette Zacharczenko

This blue weevil is one of the most strikingly beautiful insects around!
It occurs in Papau New Guinea and surrounding islands.

—-

I came across Brigette /The Weird Bug Lady's site and the unusual, fun, and cool stuffed insects that she makes. She is an entomology graduate student and crafter. She makes plush bugs while she is in graduate school studying the real ones. Need a stuffed Caddis Fly? Garden Slug? Silverfish? - the Weird Bug Lady is your gal. These are awesome!

BLUE BELL TUNICATE COLONYClavelina moluccensis©Nick Hobgood
While they look like vacuum cleaner hoses, they are actually tunicates or sea squirts and not man-made trash. 
Bluebell tunicate, blue bell tunicate, or Blue Sea Squirt, is a species of tunicate (sea squirt), in the genus Clavelina (the “little bottles”). Like all ascidians, these sessile animals are filter feeders.
This species is 0.5-2.5 cm long, and light to medium blue in colour. The top of the zooids contain characteristic dark blue patches and spots that are always visible
This species is found in the waters around Australia, Western Pacific, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, Mariana Islands, Philippines, Singapore, and Malaysia.
This species grows in clusters attached to dead coral or other hard substrates, normally under overhangs.
Tunicate blood is particularly interesting. It contains high concentrations of the transition metal vanadium and vanadium-associated proteins as well as higher than usual levels of lithium.  Some tunicates can concentrate vanadium up to a level one million times  that of the surrounding seawater. Specialized cells can concentrate  heavy metals, which are then deposited in the tunic. Source
Other posts:
Skunk Clownfish and Anemone Host
Christmas Tree Worm
Blue Lipped Clams

BLUE BELL TUNICATE COLONY
Clavelina moluccensis
©Nick Hobgood

While they look like vacuum cleaner hoses, they are actually tunicates or sea squirts and not man-made trash.

Bluebell tunicate, blue bell tunicate, or Blue Sea Squirt, is a species of tunicate (sea squirt), in the genus Clavelina (the “little bottles”). Like all ascidians, these sessile animals are filter feeders.

This species is 0.5-2.5 cm long, and light to medium blue in colour. The top of the zooids contain characteristic dark blue patches and spots that are always visible

This species is found in the waters around Australia, Western Pacific, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, Mariana Islands, Philippines, Singapore, and Malaysia.

This species grows in clusters attached to dead coral or other hard substrates, normally under overhangs.

Tunicate blood is particularly interesting. It contains high concentrations of the transition metal vanadium and vanadium-associated proteins as well as higher than usual levels of lithium. Some tunicates can concentrate vanadium up to a level one million times that of the surrounding seawater. Specialized cells can concentrate heavy metals, which are then deposited in the tunic. Source

Other posts:

Skunk Clownfish and Anemone Host

Christmas Tree Worm

Blue Lipped Clams

PYGMY LEAF CHAMELEON - world’s smallest ChameleonBrookesia minima©Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images/Newscom

An employee displays the world’s smallest  Pygmy Leaf Chameleon at Tokyo’s Sunshine International Aquarium. The chameleon is a rare species that measures only one inch in length, weighs only three grams.
It has an active habit for a chameleon and likes moving around in the low branches and leaf litter of its native rain forests. Though they are moderately aggressive towards one another, population densities in the wild may approach one animal per square meter.
The Pygmy Leaf Chameleon is endemic to the jungles of Nosy Be, an island located just off the northwest coast of Madagascar, but has extralimital distribution to Manongarivo Reserve on Madagascar’s northwest coast.
It is not known how frequently the chameleon reproduces, but a typical clutch contains two eggs. Source
Other Posts:
Mountain Chameleon
Big-nose Chameleon
Jackson’s Chameleon

PYGMY LEAF CHAMELEON - world’s smallest Chameleon
Brookesia minima
©Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images/Newscom

An employee displays the world’s smallest Pygmy Leaf Chameleon at Tokyo’s Sunshine International Aquarium. The chameleon is a rare species that measures only one inch in length, weighs only three grams.

It has an active habit for a chameleon and likes moving around in the low branches and leaf litter of its native rain forests. Though they are moderately aggressive towards one another, population densities in the wild may approach one animal per square meter.

The Pygmy Leaf Chameleon is endemic to the jungles of Nosy Be, an island located just off the northwest coast of Madagascar, but has extralimital distribution to Manongarivo Reserve on Madagascar’s northwest coast.

It is not known how frequently the chameleon reproduces, but a typical clutch contains two eggs. Source

Other Posts:

Mountain Chameleon

Big-nose Chameleon

Jackson’s Chameleon

GREY CROWNED CRANEBalearica regulorum©Aaron Logan /lightmatter.net
By Request - Which bird has a longer neck Ostrich or Flamingo?
Ostrich. But it depends on your criteria - in proportion to size? Then the longest necked bird species is the crane.
The Grey Crowned Crane is my favorite bird in the crane family. It occurs in dry savannah in Africa south of the Sahara, although it nests in somewhat wetter habitats. Like all cranes, it feeds on insects and other invertebrates, reptiles, small mammals, as well as grass seeds. The Grey Crowned Crane is the national bird of Uganda and features in the country’s flag and coat of arms. Source
Other posts:
Painted Cranes
Silhouetted Cranes
Demoiselle Crane

GREY CROWNED CRANE
Balearica regulorum
©Aaron Logan /lightmatter.net

By Request - Which bird has a longer neck Ostrich or Flamingo?

Ostrich. But it depends on your criteria - in proportion to size? Then the longest necked bird species is the crane.

The Grey Crowned Crane is my favorite bird in the crane family. It occurs in dry savannah in Africa south of the Sahara, although it nests in somewhat wetter habitats. Like all cranes, it feeds on insects and other invertebrates, reptiles, small mammals, as well as grass seeds. The Grey Crowned Crane is the national bird of Uganda and features in the country’s flag and coat of arms. Source

Other posts:

Painted Cranes

Silhouetted Cranes

Demoiselle Crane

BONE EATING SNOT FLOWER Osedax mucofloris©NHM / Nature Online
Translated from the mixed Greek and Latin used in scientific names, “Osedax mucofloris” literally means “bone-eating snot-flower” which is an unattractive name for any species, even a sea worm that feasts on dead whales. These deep-sea siboglinid polychaete worms, are alo called boneworms, zombie worms, or bone-eating worms.
Scientists from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute using the submarine ROV Tiburon first discovered the genus in Monterey Bay, California, in February 2002. The worms were found living on the bones of a decaying gray whale in the Monterey Canyon, at a depth of 2,893 m (9,491 ft).
Lacking stomach and mouth, Osedax rely on symbiotic species of bacteria to digest whale fat and oils and to release the nutrients in a form that they can absorb. Osedax have colorful feathery plumes that act as gills  and unusual root-like structures that absorb nutrients.
Male Osedax are microscopic dwarfs that live as “harems” inside  the lumen of the gelatinous tube that surrounds each female. An  individual female can house hundreds of these males in her tube. Source
Other posts:
Christmas Tree Worm
Venus Flytrap Sea Anemone
Pompeii Worm
Oaten Pipes

BONE EATING SNOT FLOWER
Osedax mucofloris
©NHM / Nature Online

Translated from the mixed Greek and Latin used in scientific names, “Osedax mucofloris” literally means “bone-eating snot-flower” which is an unattractive name for any species, even a sea worm that feasts on dead whales. These deep-sea siboglinid polychaete worms, are alo called boneworms, zombie worms, or bone-eating worms.

Scientists from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute using the submarine ROV Tiburon first discovered the genus in Monterey Bay, California, in February 2002. The worms were found living on the bones of a decaying gray whale in the Monterey Canyon, at a depth of 2,893 m (9,491 ft).

Lacking stomach and mouth, Osedax rely on symbiotic species of bacteria to digest whale fat and oils and to release the nutrients in a form that they can absorb. Osedax have colorful feathery plumes that act as gills and unusual root-like structures that absorb nutrients.

Male Osedax are microscopic dwarfs that live as “harems” inside the lumen of the gelatinous tube that surrounds each female. An individual female can house hundreds of these males in her tube. Source

Other posts:

Christmas Tree Worm

Venus Flytrap Sea Anemone

Pompeii Worm

Oaten Pipes

Female KING QUAIL or BLUE BREASTED QUAILCoturnix chinensis©Ed Jansen -de_buurman
The King Quail also known as Chinese Painted Quail, Chun-chi, Button Quail, Asian Blue Quail or Blue-breasted Quail is in the same family as the pheasants.
This species is the smallest “true quail” and is quite common in aviculture worldwide. In the wild they range from southeastern Asia to Oceania  with 10 different subspecies. It sometimes goes by the name “button  Quail”, though this name properly refers to similar-looking but  unrelated birds of the genus Turnix.
The King Quail comes in many colors from blue to brown, silver,  white, white and brown, grey, grey white brown blue etc, and have orange  feet. As with most bird species the coloring in the male is far more “showy” in than the female, but this is an extremely good shot of a female. It is similar to the sweet little Mexican Speckled female I have in my covey.
They can live up to 13 years under good care but usually 5-7 years. Source
Other posts:
Male California Quail or Valley Quail
Female Bob White Quail - “Georgia Giants”
Fledglings California Quail

Female KING QUAIL or BLUE BREASTED QUAIL
Coturnix chinensis
©Ed Jansen -de_buurman

The King Quail also known as Chinese Painted Quail, Chun-chi, Button Quail, Asian Blue Quail or Blue-breasted Quail is in the same family as the pheasants.

This species is the smallest “true quail” and is quite common in aviculture worldwide. In the wild they range from southeastern Asia to Oceania with 10 different subspecies. It sometimes goes by the name “button Quail”, though this name properly refers to similar-looking but unrelated birds of the genus Turnix.

The King Quail comes in many colors from blue to brown, silver, white, white and brown, grey, grey white brown blue etc, and have orange feet. As with most bird species the coloring in the male is far more “showy” in than the female, but this is an extremely good shot of a female. It is similar to the sweet little Mexican Speckled female I have in my covey.

They can live up to 13 years under good care but usually 5-7 years. Source

Other posts:

Male California Quail or Valley Quail

Female Bob White Quail - “Georgia Giants”

Fledglings California Quail


SCALY FOOD GASTROPODCrysomallon squamiferum© JAMSTEC
The first scaly-foot gastropod, Crysomallon squamiferum,  was found in 2000 at the bases of black smokers at the Kairei hydrothermal vent field, on the Central Indian Ridge. In contrast to the approximately 2 °C/32 °F ambient water temperature at these  depths, water emerges from these vents at temperatures ranging from  60 °C/140 °F up to as high as 464 °C/867 °F.

The snail thriving in these extreme conditions continues to attract deep-sea fan especially with its black,  iron-fortified shell and operculum. The snail’s foot is armored with iron-mineral scales. It is protected by scale-shaped sclerites composed of the iron sulfides greigite and pyrite. No other animal is known to use iron sulfides in this way.

Last December a team from JAMSTEC  (Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology) reported the  discovery of a similar white scaly-foot gastropod also in the Indian Ocean.
They found white scaly-foot gastropod during an investigation of  habitats at newly found hydrothermal vents in November 2010. Several  aggregations of white scaly-foot gastropods were found at the sites. However the white scaly-foot gastropod does not assimilate iron  sulfide. The physiological details have not yet been revealed so the questions remain: Are they same  species? How did they evolved? Why do black scaly-foots need iron  scales? Source and Source
Other posts:
Armored Snail
Pompeii Worm
Pink Helmet

SCALY FOOD GASTROPOD
Crysomallon squamiferum
© JAMSTEC

The first scaly-foot gastropod, Crysomallon squamiferum, was found in 2000 at the bases of black smokers at the Kairei hydrothermal vent field, on the Central Indian Ridge. In contrast to the approximately 2 °C/32 °F ambient water temperature at these depths, water emerges from these vents at temperatures ranging from 60 °C/140 °F up to as high as 464 °C/867 °F.
The snail thriving in these extreme conditions continues to attract deep-sea fan especially with its black, iron-fortified shell and operculum. The snail’s foot is armored with iron-mineral scales. It is protected by scale-shaped sclerites composed of the iron sulfides greigite and pyrite. No other animal is known to use iron sulfides in this way.
Last December a team from JAMSTEC (Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology) reported the discovery of a similar white scaly-foot gastropod also in the Indian Ocean.

They found white scaly-foot gastropod during an investigation of habitats at newly found hydrothermal vents in November 2010. Several aggregations of white scaly-foot gastropods were found at the sites. However the white scaly-foot gastropod does not assimilate iron sulfide. The physiological details have not yet been revealed so the questions remain: Are they same species? How did they evolved? Why do black scaly-foots need iron scales? Source and Source

Other posts:

Armored Snail

Pompeii Worm

Pink Helmet

TWENTY PLUME MOTHAlucita hexadactyla©Nigel Deacon
The Twenty-plume Moth is a “micromoth” with a wingspan of 14-16mm/~half inch. It is found in Europe and has been introduced into North America.
Unlike a typical moth, which has two pairs of scaly wings, Alucita has about twenty thin feathery plumes (with scales on the supporting  ribs). It perches with the wings outspread like a fan. The wings have a  bold zigzag pattern in white, black and brown, which together with the  shiny backward-pointing hairs on each plume make the adult moth  distinctive. The specific name hexadactyla comes from the Greek for six-fingered. 
The caterpillar larvae feed on honeysuckle (Lonicera). They are leaf miners, tunnelling inside the leaves of the food plant to avoid predators. Source
Other posts:
Vietnamese Plume Moths Mating
Creatonotos Gangis
Many Plumed Moth or Twenty Plumed Moth

TWENTY PLUME MOTH
Alucita hexadactyla
©Nigel Deacon

The Twenty-plume Moth is a “micromoth” with a wingspan of 14-16mm/~half inch. It is found in Europe and has been introduced into North America.

Unlike a typical moth, which has two pairs of scaly wings, Alucita has about twenty thin feathery plumes (with scales on the supporting ribs). It perches with the wings outspread like a fan. The wings have a bold zigzag pattern in white, black and brown, which together with the shiny backward-pointing hairs on each plume make the adult moth distinctive. The specific name hexadactyla comes from the Greek for six-fingered. 

The caterpillar larvae feed on honeysuckle (Lonicera). They are leaf miners, tunnelling inside the leaves of the food plant to avoid predators. Source

Other posts:

Vietnamese Plume Moths Mating

Creatonotos Gangis

Many Plumed Moth or Twenty Plumed Moth

CUBAN CROCODILE Crocodylus rhombifer©PaulaKoala
The Cuban crocodile is a small species (2.4 metres average length) of crocodile found only in Cuba’s Zapata Swamp and the Isle of Youth, and highly endangered, though it formerly ranged elsewhere in the Caribbean.
Small fish, freshwater arthropods, and crustaceans make up the diet of  young Cuban crocodiles. Adults of the species feed upon small mammals,  fish, and turtles. They have blunt rear teeth, which aids in crushing  the shells of their turtle prey. Cuban crocodiles also demonstrate the  jumping feeding technique seen in other crocodilians such as the American alligator. By thrusting with their powerful tail, they can leap from the water and snatch small animals from overhanging branches. The Cuban crocodile, while not a particularly large species, is often regarded as the most aggressive New World crocodile.  Data regarding attacks on humans is limited, but occurrences are likely  rare given the species very small distribution area and separation from  human populations.
Source
Other posts:
Leaping Salt Water Crocodile
Jacaré eating a Piranha
Alligator Gar (fish)

CUBAN CROCODILE
Crocodylus rhombifer
©PaulaKoala

The Cuban crocodile is a small species (2.4 metres average length) of crocodile found only in Cuba’s Zapata Swamp and the Isle of Youth, and highly endangered, though it formerly ranged elsewhere in the Caribbean.

Small fish, freshwater arthropods, and crustaceans make up the diet of young Cuban crocodiles. Adults of the species feed upon small mammals, fish, and turtles. They have blunt rear teeth, which aids in crushing the shells of their turtle prey. Cuban crocodiles also demonstrate the jumping feeding technique seen in other crocodilians such as the American alligator. By thrusting with their powerful tail, they can leap from the water and snatch small animals from overhanging branches. The Cuban crocodile, while not a particularly large species, is often regarded as the most aggressive New World crocodile. Data regarding attacks on humans is limited, but occurrences are likely rare given the species very small distribution area and separation from human populations.

Source

Other posts:

Leaping Salt Water Crocodile

Jacaré eating a Piranha

Alligator Gar (fish)

ROSITA’S BUNTING or ROSE-BELLIED BUNTINGPasserina rositae©Greg R. Homel / Natural Elements
The Rose-bellied Bunting  is a species of bird in the Cardinalidae family. It is also known as Rosita’s Bunting. It is endemic to a tiny strip of hills along the Pacific slope of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec in the Mexican states of Oaxaca and Chiapas, where it occurs in arid to semiarid thornforest and gallery woodlands. It is threatened by habitat loss. Source
Other Posts:
Indigo Bunting1
Painted Bunting
Indigo Bunting 2

ROSITA’S BUNTING or ROSE-BELLIED BUNTING
Passerina rositae
©Greg R. Homel / Natural Elements

The Rose-bellied Bunting  is a species of bird in the Cardinalidae family. It is also known as Rosita’s Bunting. It is endemic to a tiny strip of hills along the Pacific slope of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec in the Mexican states of Oaxaca and Chiapas, where it occurs in arid to semiarid thornforest and gallery woodlands. It is threatened by habitat loss. Source

Other Posts:

Indigo Bunting1

Painted Bunting

Indigo Bunting 2

ZIGZAG WHITE-BANDED NOCTUIDDonuca lanipes ©Peter Chew 
From the site:
This is one of the most beautiful moth we’d ever seen, and we’ve only seen it once. It is in the Owl Moth Family. The moth  is dark brown in colour with shiny blue green. There are the eyespot     marks on both forewings. There is the board white strip across the  forewings and     hind wings. There are the zigzag patterns along the wing bases.  In Jan 2008, we saw this large spectacular moth in Karawatha Forest She-Oak area of Brisbane, Australia. It   was resting near the base of a large but dead tree trunk. We only found this   moth once. Wingspan 60mm  SourceOther posts:
Rothschilda Moth
Garden Tiger Moth
Sino Korean Owl Moth

ZIGZAG WHITE-BANDED NOCTUID
Donuca lanipes
©Peter Chew

From the site:

This is one of the most beautiful moth we’d ever seen, and we’ve only seen it once. It is in the Owl Moth Family. The moth is dark brown in colour with shiny blue green. There are the eyespot marks on both forewings. There is the board white strip across the forewings and hind wings. There are the zigzag patterns along the wing bases.  In Jan 2008, we saw this large spectacular moth in Karawatha Forest She-Oak area of Brisbane, Australia. It was resting near the base of a large but dead tree trunk. We only found this moth once. Wingspan 60mm  Source
Other posts:

Rothschilda Moth

Garden Tiger Moth

Sino Korean Owl Moth

 ROSE-RINGED PARAKEET or RINGNECKED PARAKEETPsittacula krameri©Anirban Brahma
The Rose-ringed Parakeet is a gregarious tropical Afro-Asian parakeet  species that has an extremely large range. Since the trend of the  population appears to be increasing, the species has been evaluated as Least Concern by IUCN in 2009.
Rose-ringed parakeets are popular as pets. Both males and females have the ability to mimic human speech.  
This non-migrating bird is one of the few parrot species that have successfully adapted to  living in ‘disturbed habitats’,allowing them to withstand the onslaught  of urbanization and deforestation.  Source
Other Photos you may enjoy:
Australian King Parrot
Male Rose Ringed Parakeet
Hawkhead Parrot

ROSE-RINGED PARAKEET or RINGNECKED PARAKEET
Psittacula krameri
©Anirban Brahma

The Rose-ringed Parakeet is a gregarious tropical Afro-Asian parakeet species that has an extremely large range. Since the trend of the population appears to be increasing, the species has been evaluated as Least Concern by IUCN in 2009.

Rose-ringed parakeets are popular as pets. Both males and females have the ability to mimic human speech.

This non-migrating bird is one of the few parrot species that have successfully adapted to living in ‘disturbed habitats’,allowing them to withstand the onslaught of urbanization and deforestation.  Source

Other Photos you may enjoy:

Australian King Parrot

Male Rose Ringed Parakeet

Hawkhead Parrot

KOALA MOM and BABYPhascolarctos cinereus©Vijai Kalathur, Your Shot
Anonymous asked: where each of these animals live:
KANGAROO - Kangaroos are endemic to the country of Australia. The smaller macropods are found in Australia and New Guinea. Fact: Kangaroos (and wallabies) are adept swimmers. If pursued  into the water, a large kangaroo may use its forepaws to hold the  predator underwater so as to drown it.
GIRAFFE - Roughly Equatorial Africa and south in pockets. Fact: the tallest extant terrestrial animal and the largest ruminant
SQUIRREL - Squirrels are indigenous to the Americas, Eurasia, and Africa and have been introduced to Australia. Fact: The Indian Squirrel weighs over 4 pounds
KOALA BEAR - The koala is found in coastal regions of eastern and southern Australia. Fact: The koala is one of the few mammals that has fingerprints. Koala fingerprints are similar to human fingerprints; even with an  electron microscope, it can be quite difficult to distinguish between  the two.
WOLF - Once abundant over much of Eurasia, North Africa and North America,but has become extinct in much of Western Europe, Mexico and the USA. Fact: A study found that the domestic dog is descended from wolves tamed less than 16,300 years ago south of the Yangtse river in China
PENGUIN - a group of aquatic, flightless birds living almost exclusively in the southern hemisphere. Fact: Penguins and Polar Bears live at opposite poles, Antarctic translates to “without bears”
OCTOPUS - Global Marine Life. Fact: The largest specimen of this species to be scientifically documented was an animal with a live mass of 71 kg (156.5 lb).
SHARK - Global Marine Life. Fact: 440 species, ranging in adult length from 17 cm (6.7 in) to approximately 12 meters (39 ft) 
STARFISH - 1,800 species of starfish that occur in all the world’s oceans. Fact: Starfish occur across a broad depth range from the intertidal to abyssal depths (>6000 m).
CROCODILE - live throughout the tropics in Africa, Asia, the Americas and Australia. Fact: The land speed record for a crocodile is 17 km/h (11 mph) measured in a galloping Australian freshwater crocodile.
FROG - Global, consisting of more than 5,000 species described, they are among the most diverse groups of vertebrates. Fact: The Australian rocket frog can leap over 50 times its body length (5.5 cm), resulting in jumps of over 2 meters.
MONKEY - Temperate and Semi-Temperate Zones Globally. There are about 260 species of monkey. Many are arboreal, monkeys usually have tails. Fact: Monkeys and Apes, though often used interchangeably in the US, refer to two different families of animals.
TIGER - Asia. Over the past 100 years, they have lost 93% of their historic range, and  have been extirpated from southwest and central Asia, from the islands  of Java and Bali, and from large areas of Southeast and Eastern Asia. Fact: Although humans are not regular prey for tigers, they have killed more people than any other cat
SNAKE - Global. Snakes are found on every continent except Antarctica (and other polar regions), some large islands such as Ireland, New Zealand, and many small islands of the Atlantic and central Pacific. 15 families are currently recognized, comprising 456 genera and over 2,900 species. Fact:In the majority of snake species, only one lung is functional.
EARTHWORM -  The common name for the largest members of Oligochaeta in the phylum Annelida. From a total of around 6,000 species, only about 120 species are widely  distributed around the world. These are the peregrine or cosmopolitan  earthworms. Fact: fertile farmland may have up to 1.75 million worms/acre

KOALA MOM and BABY
Phascolarctos cinereus
©Vijai Kalathur, Your Shot

Anonymous asked: where each of these animals live:

KANGAROO - Kangaroos are endemic to the country of Australia. The smaller macropods are found in Australia and New Guinea. Fact: Kangaroos (and wallabies) are adept swimmers. If pursued into the water, a large kangaroo may use its forepaws to hold the predator underwater so as to drown it.

GIRAFFE - Roughly Equatorial Africa and south in pockets. Fact: the tallest extant terrestrial animal and the largest ruminant

SQUIRREL - Squirrels are indigenous to the Americas, Eurasia, and Africa and have been introduced to Australia. Fact: The Indian Squirrel weighs over 4 pounds

KOALA BEAR - The koala is found in coastal regions of eastern and southern Australia. Fact: The koala is one of the few mammals that has fingerprints. Koala fingerprints are similar to human fingerprints; even with an electron microscope, it can be quite difficult to distinguish between the two.

WOLF - Once abundant over much of Eurasia, North Africa and North America,but has become extinct in much of Western Europe, Mexico and the USA. Fact: A study found that the domestic dog is descended from wolves tamed less than 16,300 years ago south of the Yangtse river in China

PENGUIN - a group of aquatic, flightless birds living almost exclusively in the southern hemisphere. Fact: Penguins and Polar Bears live at opposite poles, Antarctic translates to “without bears”

OCTOPUS - Global Marine Life. Fact: The largest specimen of this species to be scientifically documented was an animal with a live mass of 71 kg (156.5 lb).

SHARK - Global Marine Life. Fact: 440 species, ranging in adult length from 17 cm (6.7 in) to approximately 12 meters (39 ft) 

STARFISH - 1,800 species of starfish that occur in all the world’s oceans. Fact: Starfish occur across a broad depth range from the intertidal to abyssal depths (>6000 m).

CROCODILE - live throughout the tropics in Africa, Asia, the Americas and Australia. Fact: The land speed record for a crocodile is 17 km/h (11 mph) measured in a galloping Australian freshwater crocodile.

FROG - Global, consisting of more than 5,000 species described, they are among the most diverse groups of vertebrates. Fact: The Australian rocket frog can leap over 50 times its body length (5.5 cm), resulting in jumps of over 2 meters.

MONKEY - Temperate and Semi-Temperate Zones Globally. There are about 260 species of monkey. Many are arboreal, monkeys usually have tails. Fact: Monkeys and Apes, though often used interchangeably in the US, refer to two different families of animals.

TIGER - Asia. Over the past 100 years, they have lost 93% of their historic range, and have been extirpated from southwest and central Asia, from the islands of Java and Bali, and from large areas of Southeast and Eastern Asia. Fact: Although humans are not regular prey for tigers, they have killed more people than any other cat

SNAKE - Global. Snakes are found on every continent except Antarctica (and other polar regions), some large islands such as Ireland, New Zealand, and many small islands of the Atlantic and central Pacific. 15 families are currently recognized, comprising 456 genera and over 2,900 species. Fact:In the majority of snake species, only one lung is functional.

EARTHWORM -  The common name for the largest members of Oligochaeta in the phylum Annelida. From a total of around 6,000 species, only about 120 species are widely distributed around the world. These are the peregrine or cosmopolitan earthworms. Fact: fertile farmland may have up to 1.75 million worms/acre